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BIRDS

Birds are winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. There are around 10,000 living species, making them the most varied of tetrapod vertebrates. They inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic.

Birds

Types of Birds

Birds are broadly charaterized into following types, here are the list of all its varieties:

Backyard Birds

  • American Crow
  • American Goldfinch
  • American Robin
  • Baltimore Oriole
  • Belted Kingfisher
  • Black-billed Magpie
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Bullock's Oriole
  • Cedar Waxwing
  • Common Raven
  • Common Yellowthroat
  • Eastern Bluebird
  • Eastern Meadowlark
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • European Starling
  • Evening Grosbeak
  • Golden-crowned Kinglet
  • Horned Lark
  • House Finch
  • House Sparrow
  • House Wren
  • Indigo Bunting
  • Mountain Bluebird
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Northern Mockingbird
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Red-eyed Vireo
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Scarlet Tanager
  • Song Sparrow
  • Spotted Towhee
  • Steller's Jay
  • Tree Swallow
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Western Kingbird
  • Western Scrub-Jay
  • Western Tanager
  • Yellow Warbler
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler

Ground Birds

  • California Quail
  • Common Nighthawk
  • Greater Prairie-Chicken
  • Greater Roadrunner
  • Mourning Dove
  • Northern Bobwhite
  • Ring-necked Pheasant
  • Rock Dove
  • Whip-poor-will
  • Wild Turkey

Hawks, Eagles, and Vultures

  • American Kestrel
  • Bald Eagle
  • Cooper's Hawk
  • Northern Harrier
  • Osprey
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Red-shouldered Hawk
  • Red-tailed Hawk
  • Sharp-shinned Hawk
  • Turkey Vulture

Hummingbirds

  • Anna's Hummingbird
  • Broad-tailed Hummingbird
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Rufous Hummingbird

Owls

  • Barn Owl
  • Barred Owl
  • Burrowing Owl
  • Eastern Screech-Owl
  • Great Horned Owl
  • Short-eared Owl

Seabirds

  • Adelie Penguin
  • Black Skimmer
  • Common Murre
  • Common Tern
  • Emperor Penguin
  • Herring Gull
  • Laughing Gull
  • Magnificent Frigatebird
  • Rockhopper Penguin
  • Royal Tern
  • Tufted Puffin

Shorebirds

  • American Oystercatcher
  • American Woodcock
  • Common Snipe
  • Greater Yellowlegs
  • Killdeer
  • Sanderling

Swimming Birds

  • American Coot
  • American Wigeon
  • Anhinga
  • Brown Pelican
  • Bufflehead
  • Canada Goose
  • Common Goldeneye
  • Common Loon
  • Double-crested Cormorant
  • Horned Grebe
  • Mallard
  • Pied-billed Grebe
  • Red-throated Loon
  • Snow Goose
  • Tundra Swan
  • Wood Duck

Wading Birds

  • Glossy Ibis
  • Great Blue Heron
  • Great Egret
  • Green Heron
  • Roseate Spoonbill
  • Sandhill Crane
  • Wood Stork

Woodpeckers

  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Northern Flicker
  • Pileated Woodpecker
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Ten Facts about Birds

  1. Most bird species use different vocalizations for different circumstances.
  2. Birds have unique digestive and respiratory systems that are highly adapted for flight.
  3. Currently about 1,200 species of birds are threatened with extinction by human activities.
  4. All living species of birds have wings - the now extinct flightless Moa of New Zealand were the only exceptions.
  5. The highest bird diversity occurs in tropical regions.
  6. Birds have one of the most complex respiratory systems of all animal groups.
  7. Bird species migrate to take advantage of global differences of seasonal temperatures, therefore optimising availability of food sources and breeding habitat.
  8. Birds communicate using primarily visual and auditory signals. Signals can be interspecific (between species) and intraspecific (within species).
  9. Ninety-five percent of bird species are socially monogamous.
  10. Birds do not have a urinary bladder or external urethral opening and uric acid is excreted along with feces as a semisolid waste (with exception of the Ostrich).







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